Sexual abuse cases in Deep River Spur diocese to file for bankruptcy

DEEP RIVER, CT – The Roman Catholic Diocese of Norwich announced last week that it has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Nearly 60 lawsuits have been filed against the diocese over alleged abuse between 1986 and 2000 at the school Mount Saint John, a former ministry of the Deep River Diocese and Residential School.

Bishop Michael R. Côté wrote in a press release posted on the diocese’s website that “the decision to file for legal redress was difficult and was only made after two years of careful deliberation … “.

The statement added: “Our counselors tell me that more than 30 diocesan, archdiocesan and religious institutions, large and small, have had to take this step in order to fairly compensate victims of abuse…”.

The lawsuits allege that the abuse at Mount Saint John Academy was committed by Brother Paul McGlade and Brother Pascal Alford. McGlade was charged with sexually assaulting young boys in Australia prior to his transfer to Connecticut, where he was appointed executive director of the Mount Saint John Academy and was also a music teacher; Alford was the leader of the school’s Boy Scouts troop. Both men are now deceased. The Catholic Order of Christian Brothers has made deals with victims of the sexual abuse of Brother Pascal Alford at the St Augustine Boys Home in Geelong, Victoria.

The Academy, which was a boarding school for at-risk children, was operated by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Norwich. It closed in 2013 and now sits vacant on top of a hill at 135 Kirtland Street in Deep River.

All public information relating to the deposit of chapter 11 is available on a site dedicated to chapter 11 on the diocesan site at the address NorwichDiocese.org.


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