Wyoming State Bankruptcy Laws

What Are The Wyoming Bankruptcy Exemptions?

WyomingWyoming law protects all or a portion of your property from being seized by creditors or the bankruptcy trustee in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you are generally allowed to keep all of your assets and property. Certain exceptions may apply, so it’s wise to consult with a Wyoming bankruptcy attorney to find which of your assets will be protected in a bankruptcy filed in Wyoming. In general, the major Wyoming bankruptcy exemptions include:

GENERAL WYOMING EXEMPTIONS
Real Estate (the Homestead Exemption)
Up to $10,000 of equity in your homestead can be protected.
Automobiles
Up to $2,400 of equity in one motor vehicle may be protected.
Other Property
$1,000 in clothing; $2,000 in furniture; books; burial plot; $2,000 in tools of trade.
View the complete list of Wyoming bankruptcy exemptions

Please remember that this page provides general information only, and is not intended to provide legal advice. The information is not a substitute for the advice of a qualified bankruptcy attorney. If you need legal assistance, consult an attorney.

Which state’s exemption laws apply in your bankruptcy?

WyomingGenerally, the laws of the state in which you lived for the 730 days (2 years) prior to filing a bankruptcy petition will apply in your bankruptcy.

If you have not lived in the same state for the 2 years immediately prior to filing your bankruptcy petition, the laws of the state in which you lived for the majority of the 180-day period preceding the 2-year period will likely apply.

If application of the preceding general rules renders you ineligible for exemptions under any state’s laws, you may be allowed to choose the federal exemptions applicable in your bankruptcy.

Is Wyoming a Community Property State?

No, Wyoming is not a community property state. Because it is not a community property state, you will be responsible for your spouse’s debts only if you voluntarily assumed those debts by, for example, co-signing on a loan given to your spouse. In a non-community property state, one spouse can file for bankruptcy and be eligible to eliminate all of their unsecured debts without the involvement of the other spouse.

How did your senator vote on the new bankruptcy laws?

Following years of intense lobbying by creditors, Congress passed the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 (BAPCPA). How did your Senators vote on these largely pro-creditor provisions?

Enzi (R-WY) — YEA
Thomas (R-WY) — YEA

Wyoming Bankruptcy Court Locations:

2120 Capitol Ave
Sixth Floor
Cheyenne, WY 82001
(307) 433-2200

111 South Wolcott
Casper, WY 82601
(307) 232-2650

Note: You may not have to actually go to one of the above bankruptcy courts. Trustees often conduct your meeting at a local venue.

Although bankruptcy is federal law, the bankruptcy courts in each jurisdiction have local rules that must be followed. A local bankruptcy attorney will be familiar with the specific rules in your area.

Wyoming Bankruptcy Attorney Locations:

Looking for a Wyoming bankruptcy attorney?
Looking for a Casper, Wyoming bankruptcy attorney?

Starting the New Year Off Debt Free With Bankruptcy

It’s a new year and a new you! But what if your new year is already feeling weighed down by the debt that was plaguing you last year? Filing bankruptcy may be able to help you truly start this year off with a financial fresh start. If you are wondering whether filing a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy is right for your specific situation here are some things to consider:

1. What debts are causing your main struggle?

Deciding to file bankruptcy can start by figuring out which debts are really causing you the most trouble. Chapter 7 bankruptcy is best for individuals whose main debt struggle is caused by credit cards, medical bills, payday loans, or other unsecured items. On the other hand Chapter 13 bankruptcy can help with secured debts like a home in foreclosure or a vehicle that is on the verge of being repossessed. If your debts do not fall in either of those categories then you may be dealing with debts that bankruptcy cannot really help with like: back taxes, parking tickets, student loans, child support or alimony.

2. Do you make enough to pay your monthly bills?

Income has a lot to do with which type of personal bankruptcy is right for you. Start by asking yourself how much money you have left over at the end of the month once you have paid necessary bills like rent, utilities, groceries, etc. If the figure you end up with is a negative number or very close to $0 then you will most likely qualify for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. If the figure you end up with is $500 or more then the bankruptcy court may conclude that you have enough to pay back some of your debts in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy repayment plan.

3. Are creditors contacting and/or garnishing you?

Some good indicators that you may need to consider the option of filing bankruptcy is when creditors begin calling you non stop, writing threatening letters, or take you to court in order to obtain a garnishment order from the judge. If anything like this is happening to you then take comfort; filing bankruptcy can stop the debt collection process in it’s tracks! That’s right, just by filing a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy the court provides a protection that keeps creditors from pursuing any type of debt collection against you. Even garnishments that are already in motion are brought to a screeching halt when the debtor files bankruptcy.

If you have been asking yourself these questions for months and are dealing with debt that you just don’t think you can overcome alone then it may be time to consider going bankrupt. Don’t let another year go by without picking up the phone and asking a bankruptcy attorney for help. Let bankruptcy help you start this new year off right by becoming debt free!

Student Loan Bankruptcy

In March 2012 a United States report showed that for the first time in history student loan debt in America had surpassed credit card debt. It was a startling, yet not completely unexpected figure. More people are going to college, college tuition is constantly on the rise, financial aid is readily available, and jobs are scarce after graduation. The average amount of student loan debt in the US today is nearly $27,000. How can an individual struggling to find a job ever find a way to pay off that massive amount of debt? Here’s how declaring bankruptcy may be the answer:

Student loans are typically placed into a category of debt that cannot be wiped away through the normal Chapter 7 bankruptcy rules. Although it is rare, there are some cases where student loan debt may be eligible to be erased if the debtor can prove that making their payments will cause them “undue hardship”. The bankruptcy court has various tests that they use to determine whether or not a hardship exists for the debtor. One of these tests is known as the Brunner test and requires showing that 1) the debtor cannot maintain, based on current income and expenses, a “minimal” standard of living for the debtor and the debtor’s dependents if forced to repay the student loans; 2) additional circumstances exist indicating that this state of affairs is likely to persist for a significant portion of the repayment period of the student loans; and 3) the debtor has made good faith efforts to repay the loans.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy rules are a little different when it comes to student loans. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows the debtor to “reorganize” their debts and pay them back through a court ordered 3-5 year repayment plan. This can be beneficial for many reasons, but one of the most important is that the student loan company can no longer set the monthly payment. The monthly payment for Chapter 13 plans are created and overseen by the bankruptcy trustee. The debtor simply mails a payment to his/her bankruptcy trustee each month for the duration of the plan and the trustee handles the disbursement. Another great thing about a Chapter 13 bankruptcy is that at the end of the 3-5 year repayment plan the debtor is not only debt free, but caught up on all secured payments like their mortgage, vehicle, and in our case student loans.

Claiming bankruptcy because of student loans is unfortunately becoming more common each year. Whether you are hiring a bankruptcy attorney or trying your hand at a do it yourself bankruptcy, remember that you must list all the debts in your name must be listed on your bankruptcy paperwork. Don’t get discouraged if you find out that your student loans cannot be erased with a bankruptcy, remember that after your case is completed you will be debt free otherwise and in a healthier financial state to make timely student loan payments. Doing this will help not only pay down your student loan debt, but help you rebuild your credit quickly after your bankruptcy is completed.

What is the Bankruptcy Code?

When faced with any life altering decision it is best to know as much information as possible about all of your options. The decision to file bankruptcy is no different. The encouraging part is that with the wealth of bankruptcy advice found on the internet and the help of a cheap bankruptcy lawyer, you can be well equipped with little trouble at all. When you begin your search into bankruptcy information don’t be afraid to ask the big questions first like “what is the bankruptcy code?”

Put simply, the “bankruptcy code” is the set of bankruptcy rules that outline everything there is to know about how bankruptcy works. But they haven’t been around forever. The “Bankruptcy Act of 1898″ was the first permanent federal bankruptcy legislation and it has changed quite a bit over the years. In fact, there have been several major amendments and reforms. The largest of all these changes was the “Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978″ which replaced the law that had been in effect since the end of the nineteenth century. This reform act is what became known as the “bankruptcy code” and a version of it still exists today.

Since 1978 there have been 4 major changes to the “bankruptcy code.” The first was the “Bankruptcy Amendments and Federal Judgeship Act of 1984,” also known as BAFJA. This set of amendments dealt primarily with bankruptcy judges and whether or not their jurisdiction should be comprehensive. Two years later Congress passed another major bankruptcy bill called the “Bankruptcy Act of 1986.” It created Chapter 12 bankruptcy that was specifically designed for family farmers. That chapter of bankruptcy was temporary and no longer exists. In 1994 Congress passed the “Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1994″ which was the first time that a large number of amendments were made to the code all at once since its conception in 1978. Finally, in 2005 the latest overhaul to the bankruptcy code was passed, known as the “Bankruptcy Abuse and Consumer Protection Act” or BACPA. This amendment changed several key items in the bankruptcy code including the number of years between filing, and what can and cannot be included in a bankruptcy. The BACPA was created to prevent abuse to the bankruptcy process by making it a bit more difficult to qualify for bankruptcy.

Overall the bankruptcy code lays out the most important rules for all chapters of bankruptcy. Obviously the Chapter 7 bankruptcy rules will differ from Chapter 13 bankruptcy rules, but they are both necessary in order for things to run smoothly once the cases are filed. The bankruptcy code can even be used when you are faced with the Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13 question that so many encounter. When looking for bankruptcy advice, utilize every resource you can. Many cheap bankruptcy lawyers offer free initial consultations so you can discuss your financial situation without feeling pressured to hire anyone. Filing bankruptcy is a huge decision, and feeling prepared with information will give you confidence throughout the process.

Colorado State Bankruptcy Laws

What are the Colorado Bankruptcy Exemptions?

ColoradoColorado law protects all or a portion of your property from being seized by creditors or the bankruptcy trustee in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you are generally allowed to keep all of your assets and property. Certain exceptions may apply, so it’s wise to consult with a Colorado bankruptcy attorney to find which of your assets will be protected in a bankruptcy filed in Colorado. In general, the major Colorado bankruptcy exemptions include:

GENERAL COLORADO EXEMPTIONS
Real Estate (Homestead)
Up to $45,000 in equity of houses, mobile homes, manufactured homes, trailers, and trailer coaches occupied by the owner may be protected.
Automobiles
One or more motor vehicles or bicycles in the aggregate value of $3,000 may be protected ($6,000 if the debtor is elderly or disabled).
Other Property
$1,500 exemption for clothing; $1,000 exemption for jewelry; and $3,000 exemption for household goods used by the debtor or the debtor’s dependents.
View the complete list of Colorado bankruptcy exemptions

Please remember that this page provides general information only, and is not intended to provide legal advice. The information is not a substitute for the advice of a qualified bankruptcy attorney. If you need legal assistance, consult an attorney.

Which state’s exemption laws apply in your bankruptcy?

ColoradoGenerally, the laws of the state in which you lived for the 730 days (2 years) prior to filing a bankruptcy petition will apply in your bankruptcy.

If you have not lived in the same state for the 2 years immediately prior to filing your bankruptcy petition, the laws of the state in which you lived for the majority of the 180-day period preceding the 2-year period will likely apply.

If application of the preceding general rules renders you ineligible for exemptions under any state’s laws, you may be allowed to choose the federal exemptions applicable in your bankruptcy.

Is Colorado a community property state?

No, Colorado is not a community property state. Because it is not a community property state, you will be responsible for your spouse’s debts only if you voluntarily assumed those debts by, for example, co-signing on a loan given to your spouse. In a non-community property state, one spouse can file for bankruptcy and be eligible to eliminate all of their unsecured debts without the involvement of the other spouse.

Did your senator vote in favor of the new bankruptcy laws?

Following years of intense lobbying by creditors, Congress passed the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 (BAPCPA). How did your Senators vote on these largely pro-creditor provisions?

Allard (R-CO) – YEA
Salazar (D-CO) – YEA

Colorado Bankruptcy Court Locations:

U.S. Custom House
721 19th Street
Denver, CO 80202-2508
(720) 904-7300

Note: You may not have to actually go to one of the above bankruptcy courts. Trustees often conduct your meeting at a local venue.

Although bankruptcy is federal law, the bankruptcy courts in each jurisdiction have local rules that must be followed. A local bankruptcy attorney will be familiar with the specific rules in your area.

Colorado Bankruptcy Attorney Locations:

Looking for a Colorado bankruptcy attorney? 
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Chase Forgives Credit Card Debt

Last week, a Senate committee summoned top executives from Bank of America, Chase, and Citigroup to review unfair credit practices that can punish people who need the most help.

Wesley Wannemacher of Lima, OH, testified on how his $3,200 of credit card debt grew to $10,700, due to late fees and a 30% interest rate. Wannemacher incurred the original credit card debt in 2001, mostly to pay for his wedding. After making $6,300 in payments since 2001, he still had a remaining balance of $4,400, thanks to $4,900 in interest, $1,100 in late fees, and $1,500 in over-limit fees.

Chase decided to forgive the remaining $4,400 of Wannemacher’s debt, and even offered him an apology. “We simply blew it”, testified Richard J. Strednicki, Chief Executive of Chase’s card services division. Chase also agreed to stop charging over-limit fees at 90 days.

This is great news for Mr. Wannemacher, but what about the rest of Chase’s customers who have also been subject to similar interest rates and fees? Now Chase has admitted that it “blew it” and waived the remaining debt, I would hope that Chase would be willing to waive the debts of the thousands of their customers with similar stories, especially those with excessive over-limit fees.

Chase opened the door for others to contact them to discuss debts incurred through unfair practices, “We look at any situation in which we have made a mistake,” said Paul Hartwick, a spokesman for Chase. “We think that we are pretty fair and responsible in the way we deal with our customers.” If you have a debt with Chase, I encourage you to call them and request for any excessive fees to be waived. Unfortunately, without the high profile of Mr. Wannemacher’s case, I fear that your results might not be as good.

Mr. Wannemacher’s story is very similar to many bankruptcy clients that I have consulted. It seems like the credit card companies money making strategy revolves around pushing consumers into more debt than they can handle, then hitting them with every sort of late and penalty fee they can imagine. Finding the disposable income to climb out of debt can be very difficult, but is often impossible when the interest and fees are so high. At some point, consumers are left with few choices, and filing bankruptcy can be the best alternative.

It’s time for the Government to step in and take some responsibility for stopping the unscrupulous tactics of the credit industry. Relying on the credit card executives to change their own policies will result in nothing more than superficial changes, and a token forgiveness of $4,400 is just a drop in the ocean that isn’t going to help the rest of Chase’s customers who are also victims of unfair credit practices.

Kentucky State Bankruptcy Laws

What Are The Kentucky Bankruptcy Exemptions?

KentuckyKentucky law protects all or a portion of your property from being seized by creditors or the bankruptcy trustee in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you are generally allowed to keep all of your assets and property. Certain exceptions may apply, so it’s wise to consult with a Kentucky bankruptcy attorney to find which of your assets will be protected in a bankruptcy filed in Kentucky. In general, the major Kentucky bankruptcy exemptions include:

GENERAL KENTUCKY EXEMPTIONS
Real Estate (the Homestead Exemption)
Up to $18,450 in the value of real property used as a residence may be protected.
Automobiles
One automobile valuing up to $2,950 can be protected.
Other Property
$475 in value in any particular item ($9,850 in aggregate value) in household furnishings, household goods, wearing apparel, appliances, books, animals, crops, or musical instruments; $1,225 in value of jewelry; $1,850 in value of any implements, professional books, or tools, of the trade of the debtor; 100 percent of the value of professionally described health aids.
Go to the complete list of Kentucky bankruptcy exemptions

Please remember that this page provides general information only, and is not intended to provide legal advice. The information is not a substitute for the advice of a qualified bankruptcy attorney. If you need legal assistance, consult an attorney.

Which state’s exemption laws apply in your bankruptcy?

KentuckyGenerally, the laws of the state in which you lived for the 730 days (2 years) prior to filing a bankruptcy petition will apply in your bankruptcy.

If you have not lived in the same state for the 2 years immediately prior to filing your bankruptcy petition, the laws of the state in which you lived for the majority of the 180-day period preceding the 2-year period will likely apply.

If application of the preceding general rules renders you ineligible for exemptions under any state’s laws, you may be allowed to choose the federal exemptions applicable in your bankruptcy.

Is Kentucky a Community Property State?

No, Kentucky is not a community property state. Because it is not a community property state, you will be responsible for your spouse’s debts only if you voluntarily assumed those debts by, for example, co-signing on a loan given to your spouse. In a non-community property state, one spouse can file for bankruptcy and be eligible to eliminate all of their unsecured debts without the involvement of the other spouse.

How did your senator vote on the new bankruptcy laws?

Following years of intense lobbying by creditors, Congress passed the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 (BAPCPA). How did your Senators vote on these largely pro-creditor provisions?

Bunning (R-KY) — YEA 
McConnell (R-KY) — YEA

Kentucky Bankruptcy Court Locations:

US Bankruptcy Court
100 E. Vine St.
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40507.
(859) 233-2608

Federal Courthouse
241 East Main Street
Bowling Green, KY 42101
(502) 627-5700

Gene Snyder Federal Courthouse
601 W. Broadway
Louisville, Kentucky 40202
(502) 627-5700

United States Courthouse
423 Frederica Street
Owensboro, KY 42301
(502) 627-5700

United States Courthouse
501 Broadway
Paducah, KY 42001
(502) 627-5700

Note: You may not have to actually go to one of the above bankruptcy courts. Trustees often conduct your meeting at a local venue.

Although bankruptcy is federal law, the bankruptcy courts in each jurisdiction have local rules that must be followed. A local bankruptcy attorney will be familiar with the specific rules in your area.

Kentucky Bankruptcy Attorney Locations:

Looking for a Kentucky bankruptcy attorney? 
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Illinois Bankruptcy Information

Of the two things that people fear most in life, death — according to researchers — is not one of them. The first fear is the catastrophic destruction of property through natural phenomenon like tornadoes or hurricanes and other events such as fire and flood. The second fear is having to file for bankruptcy.

Most people define “security” as being directly attributable to their social and financial capacity. Clearly, money really makes the world go around, and one can not live comfortably or securely without enough of it. For this reason, if you’re considering bankruptcy, it’s crucial for you to be exposed to Illinois bankruptcy information in order for the proper bankruptcy processes to be facilitated effectively. After educating yourself on Illinois bankruptcy information, you will find that filing for bankruptcy is a highly personal decision, and you should undergo a thorough process of weighing all your other options.

There can be serious repercussions when you choose to file for bankruptcy in Illinois. The first is that you must go through a supervised federal court process which can take – depending on the chapter of bankruptcy that you file – anywhere from four to six months, to five years. Secondly, although you’ve probably heard that bankruptcy destroys your credit forever, this is not true. Bankruptcy stays on your credit report for seven to ten years, depending on the credit bureau. Given that most people typically file bankruptcy in the event that they’re up to their eyeballs in debt, their credit is already in bad shape at the time of filing anyway. However, bankruptcy can prevent you from borrowing money from various creditors in the future. So, make sure to properly assess the pros and cons of your important decision on whether or not to file a bankruptcy in Illinois. The more you educate yourself on Illinois bankruptcy information, the better off you’ll be.

Through the proper understanding of Illinois bankruptcy laws, you may be able to avoid or stop garnishments, foreclosures, repossessions of your car or household goods, and the creditor harassment that comes with collection activity. In the right situations, filing for bankruptcy may be one of the best decisions you ever make. It can free you of the emotional stress and feelings of depression that are commonly associated with being trapped in situations of financial hardship.

It is also important to note that the bankruptcy laws have changed in the last decade, and not everyone who could file for a complete bankruptcy (Chapter 7) can now qualify. This is the reason why having the right Illinois bankruptcy information can spell the difference between debt freedom and disaster. For all its worth, Illinois bankruptcy information can be accessed very easily. One’s best bet is to consult a professional for a free evaluation of your case – an bankruptcy attorney who focuses on bankruptcy.

Oklahoma Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Filings on the Rise

More Oklahomans are filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy and Chapter 13 bankruptcy again.

Total statewide Oklahoma bankruptcy filings are up a total of 11.5 percent so far for 2018 compared to 2019.

In fact, many Oklahoman bankruptcy court officials and bankruptcy attorneys believe that bankruptcy filings will eventually return to the pre-2005 bankruptcy law change numbers.

(In October, 2005, Congress passed the Bankruptcy Abuse and Consumer Protection Act making Chapter 7 bankruptcy income-dependent and more difficult to file for individuals and married couples).

These Oklahoman bankruptcy attorneys and officials believe Chapter 7 & Chapter 13 bankruptcy filings will continue to rise for several reasons.

First, the economy continues to remain sluggish, with no real end of the downturn in sight.Secondly, many people are able to obtain much more credit than they can repay, often at outrageous interest rates.Lastly, due to the sub-prime mortgage industry fallout, foreclosures are at a record high.

While people have the ability to save their homes from foreclosure by filing Chapter 13 bankruptcy, many individuals and married couple have come to the realize that they can not afford their monthly mortgage payments on a going-forward basis and have decided to turn in or “surrender” their property by filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Other states have also seen notable increases as well, most notably Michigan and Georgia.

Click here for a free evaluation with a qualified bankruptcy attorney and see if Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy is right for you, or visit Directory Free for additional legal information.

North Carolina State Bankruptcy Laws

What Are The North Carolina Bankruptcy Exemptions?

North CarolinaNorth Carolina law protects all or a portion of your property from being seized by creditors or the bankruptcy trustee in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you are generally allowed to keep all of your assets and property. Certain exceptions may apply, so it’s wise to consult with a North Carolina bankruptcy attorney to find which of your assets will be protected in a bankruptcy filed in North Carolina. In general, the major North Carolina bankruptcy exemptions include:

GENERAL NORTH CAROLINAEXEMPTIONS
Real Estate (the Homestead Exemption)
Up to $10,000 of equity in real property or personal property used as a residence can be protected.
Automobiles
Up to $1,500 of equity in one motor vehicle can be protected.
Other Property
The debtor’s aggregate interest in any property, not to exceed $3,500 less any amount claimed under the homestead exemption; $3,500 in value for the debtor plus $750 for each dependent of the debtor, not to exceed $3,000 total for dependents, in household furnishings, household goods, clothing, appliances, books, animals, crops, or musical instruments; the debtor’s aggregate interest, not to exceed $750 in value, in any implements, professional books, or tools of the trade.
View the complete list of North Carolina bankruptcy exemptions

Please remember that this page provides general information only, and is not intended to provide legal advice. The information is not a substitute for the advice of a qualified bankruptcy attorney. If you need legal assistance, consult an attorney.

Which state’s exemption laws apply in your bankruptcy?

North CarolinaGenerally, the laws of the state in which you lived for the 730 days (2 years) prior to filing a bankruptcy petition will apply in your bankruptcy.

If you have not lived in the same state for the 2 years immediately prior to filing your bankruptcy petition, the laws of the state in which you lived for the majority of the 180-day period preceding the 2-year period will likely apply.

If application of the preceding general rules renders you ineligible for exemptions under any state’s laws, you may be allowed to choose the federal exemptions applicable in your bankruptcy.

Is North Carolina a Community Property State?

No, North Carolina is not a community property state. Because it is not a community property state, you will be responsible for your spouse’s debts only if you voluntarily assumed those debts by, for example, co-signing on a loan given to your spouse. In a non-community property state, one spouse can file for bankruptcy and be eligible to eliminate all of their unsecured debts without the involvement of the other spouse.

How did your senator vote on the new bankruptcy laws?

Following years of intense lobbying by creditors, Congress passed the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 (BAPCPA). How did your Senators vote on these largely pro-creditor provisions?

Burr (R-NC) — YEA
Dole (R-NC) — YEA

North Carolina Bankruptcy Court Locations:

U.S. Bankruptcy Court
1760-A Parkwood Blvd
Wilson, NC 27893
(252) 237-0248

U.S. Bankruptcy Court
P.O. Box 1441
300 Fayetteville Street, Second Floor
Raleigh, N.C. 27602-1441
(919) 856-4752

101 S. Edgeworth Street
Greensboro, NC 27401
(336) 333-5647

226 S. Liberty Street
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
(336) 631-5340

Charles Jonas Federal Building
401 West Trade Street, Room 111
Charlotte, NC 28202
(704) 350-7500

U.S. Bankruptcy Court
Western District of North Carolina
Asheville Division
100 Otis Street, Room 112
Asheville, NC 28801-2611
Phone (828) 771-7300

Note: You may not have to actually go to one of the above bankruptcy courts. Trustees often conduct your meeting at a local venue.

Although bankruptcy is federal law, the bankruptcy courts in each jurisdiction have local rules that must be followed. A local bankruptcy attorney will be familiar with the specific rules in your area.

North Carolina Bankruptcy Attorney Locations:

Looking for a North Carolina bankruptcy attorney? 
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