Debts Bankruptcy Won’t Eliminate

Credit cards, medical bills, repossessions, utility bills and most other unsecured debts are dischargeable in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy . Secured debts, like mortgages or auto loans, usually can be discharged only if you are willing to surrender the property that was used as collateral. Otherwise, you can typically keep the property if you are current and continue making timely monthly payments.

However, a handful of debts cannot be eliminated in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. These include Student Loans, some IRS or State Income Tax Debts, Child Support or Alimony Obligations, Government Fines, and some debts ordered by a divorce decree. Congress drafted the bankruptcy laws and in their own interests made it very difficult to file bankruptcy on any government debt.

What bankruptcy options do you have if you are burdened with these non-dischargeable debts?

Individuals who have non-dischargeable debts are also often facing other financial difficulties and are in a cycle of debt that includes credit cards, loans, and other unsecured debts. One option is to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy to eliminate any unsecured debts and legally stop making any more payments to your unsecured creditors; this will free up some disposable income and allow you to focus on repaying any debts that survived the bankruptcy. Although the non-dischargeable debts will not be eliminated, the broad protection of the automatic stay may give you some protection from government creditors during the bankruptcy, absent a court order lifting the stay from the bankruptcy judge.

A second option is to file a Chapter 13 bankruptcy and include your non-dischargeable debts in the court monitored repayment plan. It is possible to repay only a portion of your non-dischargeable debts back while you are in the bankruptcy, but you’ll still be liable for the percentage that wasn’t paid back after the bankruptcy. The advantage is that the bankruptcy laws prevent even government creditors from garnishing your wages or harassing you while you are actively in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy. With a little breathing room from your creditors and the ability to eliminate a portion of your unsecured debts, you have sufficient opportunity to increase your income or make other arrangements for repaying the non-dischargeable debts after the bankruptcy

FreshStartForms Debt Reduction Program

Edward C. Sanchez, Debt Reduction Specialist, has developed a debt reduction process to help you break the debt cycle and pay down your debts. The information draws from the knowledge Edward has gained from his extensive experience interacting with individuals considering bankruptcy.

The FreshStartForms.com Debt Reduction program uses the “B.A.M” Process, a unique 3 step process that fundamentally change the way you consume on a daily basis. The steps are 1) Budget, 2) Audit, 3)Monitor.

After completing the B.A.M process you will have established a realistic picture of your complete financial situation. It is critical to have this information to determine if bankruptcy alternatives are available to you.

FreshStartForms Debt Reduction Program

Edward C. Sanchez, Debt Reduction Specialist, has developed a debt reduction process to help you break the debt cycle and pay down your debts. The information draws from the knowledge Edward has gained from his extensive experience interacting with individuals considering bankruptcy.

The FreshStartForms.com Debt Reduction program uses the “B.A.M” Process, a unique 3 step process that fundamentally change the way you consume on a daily basis. The steps are 1) Budget, 2) Audit, 3)Monitor.

After completing the B.A.M process you will have established a realistic picture of your complete financial situation. It is critical to have this information to determine if bankruptcy alternatives are available to you.

Bankruptcy Filings Up 60% in Arizona:

The Arizona Republic reports that Arizona bankruptcy filings for the first half of 2007 have increased 60 percent from the number of Arizona bankruptcy filings for the first half of 2006, with 895 bankrutpcy petitions filed in June, the highest monthly total of 2007.

The article cites credit card debt, higher mortgage payments, and medical bills as factors driving the trend.

Many bankruptcy attorneys I have talked with would agree with this and have commented that the current market conditions have lead to the “perfect storm”, with adjustable rate mortgages dramatically increasing, credit card minimums increasing, and home equity loans becoming harder to qualify for due to the soft housing market and tighter lending requirements.

The dramatic increase in filings may surprise some people, but the Arizona bankruptcy statistics are misleading. I attribute the increase to primarily be a result of the bankruptcy law change (BACPA), which created a huge rush to file at the end of 2005, artificially depressing the number of bankruptcy filings for the first half of 2006. The bankruptcy law changes have being widely criticized, but most individuals still qualify for either a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13bankruptcy.

For more information, you can read the entire article here: http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/business/articles/0716biz-Bankruptcy0717-ON.html

Lean more about Arizona Bankruptcy Laws
Receive a Free Legal Evaluation from an Arizona Bankruptcy Attorney

Debts Bankruptcy Won’t Eliminate

Credit cards, medical bills, repossessions, utility bills and most other unsecured debts are dischargeable in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy . Secured debts, like mortgages or auto loans, usually can be discharged only if you are willing to surrender the property that was used as collateral. Otherwise, you can typically keep the property if you are current and continue making timely monthly payments.

However, a handful of debts cannot be eliminated in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. These include Student Loans, some IRS or State Income Tax Debts, Child Support or Alimony Obligations, Government Fines, and some debts ordered by a divorce decree. Congress drafted the bankruptcy laws and in their own interests made it very difficult to file bankruptcy on any government debt.

What bankruptcy options do you have if you are burdened with these non-dischargeable debts?

Individuals who have non-dischargeable debts are also often facing other financial difficulties and are in a cycle of debt that includes credit cards, loans, and other unsecured debts. One option is to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy to eliminate any unsecured debts and legally stop making any more payments to your unsecured creditors; this will free up some disposable income and allow you to focus on repaying any debts that survived the bankruptcy. Although the non-dischargeable debts will not be eliminated, the broad protection of the automatic stay may give you some protection from government creditors during the bankruptcy, absent a court order lifting the stay from the bankruptcy judge.

A second option is to file a Chapter 13 bankruptcy and include your non-dischargeable debts in the court monitored repayment plan. It is possible to repay only a portion of your non-dischargeable debts back while you are in the bankruptcy, but you’ll still be liable for the percentage that wasn’t paid back after the bankruptcy. The advantage is that the bankruptcy laws prevent even government creditors from garnishing your wages or harassing you while you are actively in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy. With a little breathing room from your creditors and the ability to eliminate a portion of your unsecured debts, you have sufficient opportunity to increase your income or make other arrangements for repaying the non-dischargeable debts after the bankruptcy

Bankruptcy Filings Up 60% in Arizona:

The Arizona Republic reports that Arizona bankruptcy filings for the first half of 2007 have increased 60 percent from the number of Arizona bankruptcy filings for the first half of 2006, with 895 bankrutpcy petitions filed in June, the highest monthly total of 2007.

The article cites credit card debt, higher mortgage payments, and medical bills as factors driving the trend.

Many bankruptcy attorneys I have talked with would agree with this and have commented that the current market conditions have lead to the “perfect storm”, with adjustable rate mortgages dramatically increasing, credit card minimums increasing, and home equity loans becoming harder to qualify for due to the soft housing market and tighter lending requirements.

The dramatic increase in filings may surprise some people, but the Arizona bankruptcy statistics are misleading. I attribute the increase to primarily be a result of the bankruptcy law change (BACPA), which created a huge rush to file at the end of 2005, artificially depressing the number of bankruptcy filings for the first half of 2006. The bankruptcy law changes have being widely criticized, but most individuals still qualify for either a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13bankruptcy.

What to Expect at Your 341 Meeting of the Creditors

At the filing of either your Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy , a mandatory proceeding called a “341 Meeting of the Creditors ” is scheduled by the bankruptcy court.  Depending on your jurisdiction and the volume of bankruptcies filed, your 341 Meeting will happen anywhere from 30 to 60 days after the filing of your case.  In populated states like California , New York , Texas and Florida , 341 Meetings occur typically 45 to 60 days after filing since these courts often get backlogged.  In less populated states such as Idaho , Iowa , Wyoming and North Dakota , 341 Meetings usually take place closer to 30 days after the filing of a bankruptcy because there are less total bankruptcies being filed.  You will receive official notice from the Bankruptcy Court of your 341 Meeting’s date, place and time.

341 Meetings are supervised by a government-appointed Bankruptcy Trustee.  Your Trustee’s duties are to handle the administration of your case and represent the creditors at your 341 Meeting in their absence. (NOTE***Your creditors in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy will rarely ever show for your 341 meeting. There are also no judges present at 341 Meetings in either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcies.) 

The Bankruptcy Trustee’s job at your Chapter 7 341 Meeting is determine whether or not you have the ability to repay your debt based on your income or have any assets that he/she can liquidate to repay your creditors. The Trustee’s job at your Chapter 13 341 Meeting is to make sure that you have filed a feasible plan and are repaying the correct amount to your creditors based on your economic situation at the time of filing.  At either 341 Meeting, you’ll be required to testify under oath regarding your filed bankruptcy petition schedules, finances and income.  Answer all the Trustee’s questions truthfully.  While the Trustee is an adversary in your bankruptcy proceeding, their intention is not to try to verbally trip you up or corner you, they simply want to make sure that your bankruptcy schedules are accurate and that you qualify to file bankruptcy. If you have any additional concerns, make sure your bankruptcy attorneydiscusses all details of your case with you prior to the filing of either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy so there are no surprises at your Creditor’s Meeting.

341 Meetings are rather informal and you can dress casually, but try to look presentable.  Where you live will dictate what you need to bring to your Meeting of the Creditors, and your attorney will advise you prior to the Meeting.  As a general rule, you’ll need to bring:

What to Expect at Your 341 Meeting of the Creditors

At the filing of either your Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy , a mandatory proceeding called a “341 Meeting of the Creditors ” is scheduled by the bankruptcy court.  Depending on your jurisdiction and the volume of bankruptcies filed, your 341 Meeting will happen anywhere from 30 to 60 days after the filing of your case.  In populated states like California , New York , Texas and Florida , 341 Meetings occur typically 45 to 60 days after filing since these courts often get backlogged.  In less populated states such as Idaho , Iowa , Wyoming and North Dakota , 341 Meetings usually take place closer to 30 days after the filing of a bankruptcy because there are less total bankruptcies being filed.  You will receive official notice from the Bankruptcy Court of your 341 Meeting’s date, place and time.

341 Meetings are supervised by a government-appointed Bankruptcy Trustee.  Your Trustee’s duties are to handle the administration of your case and represent the creditors at your 341 Meeting in their absence. (NOTE***Your creditors in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy will rarely ever show for your 341 meeting. There are also no judges present at 341 Meetings in either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcies.) 

The Bankruptcy Trustee’s job at your Chapter 7 341 Meeting is determine whether or not you have the ability to repay your debt based on your income or have any assets that he/she can liquidate to repay your creditors. The Trustee’s job at your Chapter 13 341 Meeting is to make sure that you have filed a feasible plan and are repaying the correct amount to your creditors based on your economic situation at the time of filing.  At either 341 Meeting, you’ll be required to testify under oath regarding your filed bankruptcy petition schedules, finances and income.  Answer all the Trustee’s questions truthfully.  While the Trustee is an adversary in your bankruptcy proceeding, their intention is not to try to verbally trip you up or corner you, they simply want to make sure that your bankruptcy schedules are accurate and that you qualify to file bankruptcy. If you have any additional concerns, make sure your bankruptcy attorneydiscusses all details of your case with you prior to the filing of either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy so there are no surprises at your Creditor’s Meeting.

341 Meetings are rather informal and you can dress casually, but try to look presentable.  Where you live will dictate what you need to bring to your Meeting of the Creditors, and your attorney will advise you prior to the Meeting.  As a general rule, you’ll need to bring:

What to Expect at Your 341 Meeting of the Creditors

At the filing of either your Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy , a mandatory proceeding called a “341 Meeting of the Creditors ” is scheduled by the bankruptcy court.  Depending on your jurisdiction and the volume of bankruptcies filed, your 341 Meeting will happen anywhere from 30 to 60 days after the filing of your case.  In populated states like California , New York , Texas and Florida , 341 Meetings occur typically 45 to 60 days after filing since these courts often get backlogged.  In less populated states such as Idaho , Iowa , Wyoming and North Dakota , 341 Meetings usually take place closer to 30 days after the filing of a bankruptcy because there are less total bankruptcies being filed.  You will receive official notice from the Bankruptcy Court of your 341 Meeting’s date, place and time.

341 Meetings are supervised by a government-appointed Bankruptcy Trustee.  Your Trustee’s duties are to handle the administration of your case and represent the creditors at your 341 Meeting in their absence. (NOTE***Your creditors in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy will rarely ever show for your 341 meeting. There are also no judges present at 341 Meetings in either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcies.) 

The Bankruptcy Trustee’s job at your Chapter 7 341 Meeting is determine whether or not you have the ability to repay your debt based on your income or have any assets that he/she can liquidate to repay your creditors. The Trustee’s job at your Chapter 13 341 Meeting is to make sure that you have filed a feasible plan and are repaying the correct amount to your creditors based on your economic situation at the time of filing.  At either 341 Meeting, you’ll be required to testify under oath regarding your filed bankruptcy petition schedules, finances and income.  Answer all the Trustee’s questions truthfully.  While the Trustee is an adversary in your bankruptcy proceeding, their intention is not to try to verbally trip you up or corner you, they simply want to make sure that your bankruptcy schedules are accurate and that you qualify to file bankruptcy. If you have any additional concerns, make sure your bankruptcy attorneydiscusses all details of your case with you prior to the filing of either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy so there are no surprises at your Creditor’s Meeting.

341 Meetings are rather informal and you can dress casually, but try to look presentable.  Where you live will dictate what you need to bring to your Meeting of the Creditors, and your attorney will advise you prior to the Meeting.  As a general rule, you’ll need to bring:

1) a valid photo I.D.
2) a social security card
3) your tax returns from the last two years
4) the last two-to-six months of paystubs or proof of income prior to your filing date 

All in all, 341 Meetings move quick and usually only take 5 to 10 minutes to administer.  In Chapter 7 bankruptcies, you will receive your discharge papers roughly 60-90 days after filing.

Contact us now or use the form to apply now

Copyright © 2019 acfa cashflow | All Rights Reserved